A revolution in teaching

“𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝑏𝑜𝑜𝑘 𝑖𝑠 𝑚𝑎𝑑𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑝𝑎𝑝𝑒𝑟, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑙𝑖𝑘𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑝𝑒𝑟 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑞𝑢𝑖𝑐𝑘𝑙𝑦 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑠𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑒𝑎𝑟.”

– Johannes Trithemius (1492)

Johannes Trithemius, was a German polymath who was active in the German Renaissance as a lexicographer, chronicler, cryptographer, and occultist. That is enough credentials to give weight to what he said. But, as we all know books became a part of our life, soon after.𝗜𝘁 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗮𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝟭𝟰𝟰𝟰, 𝘁𝗵𝗮𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗘𝘂𝗿𝗼𝗽𝗲𝗮𝗻 𝗹𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘀𝗰𝗮𝗽𝗲 𝘄𝗮𝘀 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗱𝘂𝗰𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗽𝗿𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗽𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘀, 𝘄𝗵𝗶𝗰𝗵, 𝗲𝘃𝗲𝗻𝘁𝘂𝗮𝗹𝗹𝘆, 𝗹𝗲𝗱 𝘁𝗼 𝗯𝗼𝗼𝗸𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗶𝘁’𝘀 𝗮𝗹𝗹𝗶𝗲𝗱 𝗽𝗿𝗼𝗱𝘂𝗰𝘁𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗹𝗱. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗼𝗱𝘂𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗼𝗳 𝗽𝗿𝗶𝗻𝘁𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗽𝗿𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝘄𝗮𝘀, 𝗺𝗮𝘆𝗯𝗲, 𝗶𝗻 𝗖𝗵𝗶𝗻𝗮 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝟭𝘀𝘁 𝗺𝗶𝗹𝗹𝗲𝗻𝗶𝗮, 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝗚𝘂𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗯𝗲𝗿𝗴 𝗺𝗮𝗱𝗲 𝗶𝘁 𝗳𝗮𝗺𝗼𝘂𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗹𝗱.As can be seen, from the statement of the polymath, there was opposition and ridiculing of this change. The large scale adoption of this new technology did take a few decades, if not a couple of centuries. It was a shift from the traditional mode of education dissemination, back then.In these times, we are also on the cusp of something similar. The change is, obviously, faster than the adoption of the Gutenberg printing press, but it is here to stay. The consumption of data is to a large extent digital in nature nowadays. Especially, since the advent of COVID-19 pandemic in the early 2020, the adoption of digital content has accelerated. Either one can critique this new technology like the German polymath (mentioned at the start), or make good use of this welcome change.𝗡𝗼, 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝗺𝗲𝗱𝗶𝘂𝗺 𝗼𝗳 𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀 𝗻𝗼𝘁 𝗮 𝗿𝗲𝗽𝗹𝗮𝗰𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘁𝗿𝗮𝗱𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗺𝗼𝗱𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻. 𝗜𝘁 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝘆 𝘀𝘁𝗿𝗶𝘃𝗲𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗲𝗻𝗵𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗮𝗰𝗰𝗲𝘀𝘀 𝘁𝗼 𝗾𝘂𝗮𝗹𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘄𝗶𝗱𝗲𝗿 𝗽𝗼𝗽𝘂𝗹𝗮𝗰𝗲. 𝗜𝘁 𝗶𝘀 𝗮 𝘄𝗶𝗻-𝘄𝗶𝗻 𝘀𝗶𝘁𝘂𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗶𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗿𝘂𝗰𝘁𝗼𝗿 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝘁𝘂𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁. The adoption of anything new has a lot of naysayers, initially. But, an eventuality whose time has come, is going to stay. It is always better to adapt to these changes sooner than latter. Let’s take another example to clarify the point highlighted here. Only about a hundred-plus years ago, the roads (especially the western ones) were filled with a large amount of horse manure. “𝐼𝑛 50 𝑦𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑠, 𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑦 𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑒𝑒𝑡 𝑖𝑛 𝐿𝑜𝑛𝑑𝑜𝑛 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑏𝑒 𝑏𝑢𝑟𝑖𝑒𝑑 𝑢𝑛𝑑𝑒𝑟 9 𝑓𝑒𝑒𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑎𝑛𝑢𝑟𝑒.”-Times of London (1894)Automobiles took to the streets, pretty soon, after that, and didn’t let that prediction come true. It revolutionized the landscape of transportation in a few decades. Nowadays, a horse chariot is a thing of the distant past. The transition in education, nowadays, is somewhat similar even in the so-called ‘developing countries’. 𝗜𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝗽𝗲𝗿𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁? 𝗡𝗼𝗜𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝗮 𝗿𝗲𝗽𝗹𝗮𝗰𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁? 𝗡𝗼𝗗𝗼𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝗶𝗻𝗰𝗿𝗲𝗮𝘀𝗲 𝗮𝗰𝗰𝗲𝘀𝘀, 𝗱𝗲𝗺𝗼𝗰𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗶𝘇𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻? 𝗬𝗲𝘀𝗖𝗮𝗻 𝗶𝘁 𝗯𝗲 𝗯𝗲𝘁𝘁𝗲𝗿? 𝗬𝗲𝘀𝗖𝗮𝗻 𝗶𝘁 𝗯𝗲 𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗱𝘂𝗮𝗹𝗶𝘇𝗲𝗱 𝗮𝗰𝗰𝗼𝗿𝗱𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝘁𝘂𝗱𝗲𝗻𝘁’𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗾𝘂𝗶𝗿𝗲𝗺𝗲𝗻𝘁? 𝗬𝗲𝘀𝗧𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗿𝗲 𝗮 𝗽𝗹𝗲𝘁𝗵𝗼𝗿𝗮 𝗼𝗳 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀, 𝗯𝘂𝘁 𝗼𝗻𝗹𝗶𝗻𝗲 𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀 𝗵𝗲𝗿𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝘆. Also, the access to education is democratized and the quality is improving at an exponential rate. What one is seeing now is only the tip of the iceberg. 𝗧𝗵𝗲 𝗶𝗻𝗳𝗿𝗮𝘀𝘁𝗿𝘂𝗰𝘁𝘂𝗿𝗲 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝘀𝗮𝗺𝗲 𝗶𝘀 𝗿𝗲𝗮𝗱𝘆; 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗾𝘂𝗲𝘀𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗶𝘀, “𝗔𝗿𝗲 𝘆𝗼𝘂?”

Published by centrestage2021

Future of Education

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